ASU’s music therapy program welcomes new professor with diverse clinical background

By

Lynne MacDonald

Music therapist Sarah Hameline joins the ASU School of Music, Dance and Theatre in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts as a clinical assistant professor in music therapy this August. Hameline will be coordinating and supervising the music therapy program’s student practicum and preclinical experiences.

“I was attracted to ASU's music therapy program due to the strong reputation it has held in the music therapy community for so long — there is no other program like it in the country,” Hameline said. “When I lived on the East Coast, I spent many hours reading texts written by ASU faculty, and I am excited to be part of a program that I had previously read about.”

Hameline’s career as a music therapist spans 16 years working with a variety of populations including children with autism, families receiving in-home therapy, veterans, hospice patients, children with special needs in a school setting and people receiving inpatient psychiatric care.

Currently a music therapist and the clinical supervisor at St. Luke’s Behavioral Health Center, Hameline works within a team of music therapists, recreational therapists, physicians, psychiatrists, registered nurses and social workers.

“We are thrilled to have attracted a music therapist with such a wealth of experience to our faculty,” said Heather Landes, director of the School of Music, Dance and Theatre. “Hameline’s diverse practice and eclectic background of clinical populations serves to broaden ASU music therapy students’ education on practical applications of music therapy and brings a new level of professionalism to our program.”

As a board certified music therapist and neurologic music therapist, Hameline has pursued advanced training in neurological music therapy, grief and loss music therapy, guided imagery and music, and music therapy-assisted childbirth. During her past eight years working in the Phoenix area, she has connected with local music therapists fostering interest in becoming involved in the ASU program.

Hameline, along with a fellow colleague, developed the first practicum experience at St. Luke's Behavioral Health to mentor students from ASU. The successful program has recently evolved to accept interns. 

Hameline said she became interested in teaching music therapy after she joined the School of Music in spring 2020 as an instructor and clinical supervisor for the ASU Practicum Program. Because of that experience, Hameline said she realized she wanted to guide and mentor students at the professional level and share her experience in a live learning environment.  

“Music therapy is a talent and skill-based profession — both facets of a student’s education that can be sharpened through strategic work in their education,” said Hameline. “I hope to guide them to a successful outcome.”

Hameline holds a Master of Science in music therapy from Radford University and a Bachelor of Science in music therapy from the State University of New York at Fredonia.